H – Dancing reported by Police

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HACKETT, Thomas

Glee singing and dancing round a constable

Thomas Coust, Thomas Hackett, and Willam Biggs, a trio of the most amiable description, were charged with glee singing in George-street.

” A boat, a boat and to the ferry, For we’ll go over to be merry,

To laugh and quiff and drink old sherry.”

A constable amazed at this course of proceeding, stepped up and wished to know what they were at, when they joined hands and danced in a circle round him; irritated at this, he surrounded them, as Pal would say, and conveyed them to the lock-up ; they now looked in each other’s face with amazement and appeared astonished at their vagaries. The usual question touching the pecuniary having been put and answered in the negative with a melancholy shake of the, they to the Stocks took their lonely way, there to repose and enjoy the healthful breezes and glorious sunshine for one hour each.

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1837, April 11). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved January 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2210369

The glee sung by Coust, Biggs and Hackett.  A Broadside ballad by J. Catnach Printer, Monmouth Court, 7 Dials, London. (1813-1838)


 
 

HATHAWAY, John and Hannah

Dancing & fiddle playing – case discharged, 1825 Sydney

MAY 20.— John Hathaway and Hannah, his wife, both holding tickets of leave, stood at the bar to answer to a charge made against them by three of the Sydney constables, for obstructing, resisting, and assaulting them in the execution of their duty. Mr. Solicitor Allen attended for the parties charged, and displayed a considerable share of legal ability and discriminative judgment in conducting the defence. It appeared that the constables had entered a private house in Sydney, between the hours of 8 and 9, having heard dancing, singing, and a fiddle playing therein, and that on their entering the house, a violent scuffle ensued, producing a reciprocity of hostilities, confusion, and disorder, in the course of which the male prisoner was severely cut, and his wife, in attempting to rescue her husband, received some personal injury.

After the evidence of the three constables had been taken, witnesses were called to support the charge and, as Mr. Allen stated, would shew that the constables had been the aggressors. Four were examined, whose depositions certainly went to the confirmation of Mr. Allen’s statement. The case occupied the attention of the Bench for a considerable time. The characters of the parties accused were found to be reputable, and the result was that they were discharged. The Magistrates, however, took occasion to observe to the constables, that they had in this instance exceeded their duty (to say the least of it), and gave them to understand, that any outrage of that nature, in which they might hereafter be implicated, would subject them to the visitations justly due to any violation of the public peace, which they were bound as well to protect as to preserve.

POLICE REPORT. (1825, May 26). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184072

 
 

HATHAWAY, John

Could play the fiddle like a Paganini, and dance a good stick, 1833 Sydney

MONDAY.—John Hathaway was charged with having a way, and a very annoying one to, of taking himself off to sly grog shops, where, as he could tell a good yarn, play the fiddle like a Paganini, and dance a good stick, he was always welcome, and further, having studied under Mendoza*, he had also a way of giving the constables his one, two, with considerable effect, before he could be caught. The Bench ordered him to try the way of the mill for 14 days.

*Daniel Mendoza (5 July 1764 – 3 September 1836) was an English prizefighter, who became the 18th boxing champion of England from 1792–1795

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1833, January 17). The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved December 16, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12846088

Dancing and fiddling. Henry William Bunbury (1782) © The Trustees of the British Museum

 
 

HELY, Maria

A three-handed reel, 1836 Sydney

Kate Hoy, Maria Hely, and Ellen Gorman, were charged with bolting and becoming remarkably funny, which caused them to dance a three-handed reel in George-street, to the amazement of folks returning from Church, after a little trouble and a short chase they were secured. In defence they all commenced, chattering at once with the greatest volubility, expatiating upon their respective merits- better servants never lived- they were quite the thing – always did as ordered – couldn’t think how it occurred. This harangue was cut short by each,of them being sent lo the Factory for a month. They left the Court jabbering like so many talkative magpies.

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1836, November 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved May 23, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2207626

 

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HICKS

A highland reel naked, 1834 Sydney

A woman, by the name of Hicks, was taken in charge on Monday night, for dancing a highland reel in the public streets, in a state of nudity. She was taken to the police office, and sentenced to pay £5, and in default of payment, to be confined in the Sydney Gaol for 2 calendar months.

“ACCIDENTS, OFFENCES, &c.” The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842) 6 Mar 1834: 3. Web. 3 May 2013 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12848812>.

 
 

HILL, Mic

Sent to trip the light fantastic, 1833 Sydney

Mic Hill, a lad who would have money, he’d get honestly if he could, but he gave his master plumply to understand, without any circumlocution, that he would at all events get it, and he therefore advised his master to tip up without delay. ” Come old shaver,” said Mic, “rout out your money bags.” Instead of which his master routed out a constable, and sent him to the P. O., and the Bench sent him to trip it on the light fantastic toe at Murray’s dancing rooms*.

*A satirical name for the Treadmill – it was comically referred to as the dancing academy.  Andrew Murray was the superintendent of the Carters’ Barracks from 1827 to 1834 and was in charge of the government treadmill (near today’s Central Station)..

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1833, February 25). The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved January 2, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12846298

The government treadmill was located at the Carters Barracks (near today’s Central Station).
Views of Sydney (1840) Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales


 
 

HORDEN, William

Dancing seraband to mouth organ, 1833 Sydney

THURSDAY.-William Ball, William Horden, and Arthur Parr, three of the Sydney swell mob, . were placed at the bar, to clear themselves of the charge of vagabondism, which was made against them, they having been picked up in the street late overnight, dancing a seraband to music pulled out of a mouth organ. It appeared, that the prisoners were part of a gang of eight, who pig together in a wretched hovel, behind the market-place, from which they make nightly sorties on expeditions, that may be guessed at. There being no positive proof of any offence against them, anti they stoutly maintaining they were engaged on board ship, the Bench discharged them, with an order to the charleys to keep a bright eye upon them.

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1833, June 10). The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842), p. 2 (Supplement to the Sydney Herald.). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12846998

The mouth-organ was developed in Europe in the 1820s and quickly became popular in the colony. This illustration features on the cover of an instruction manual which included ‘a selection of popular melodies, expressly arranged for the instrument’ (1830).  Courtesy of New York Public Library


 
 

HOY, Kate

A three-handed reel, 1836 Sydney

Kate Hoy, Maria Hely, and Ellen Gorman, were charged with bolting and becoming remarkably funny, which caused them to dance a three-handed reel in George-street, to the amazement of folks returning from Church, after a little trouble and a short chase they were secured. In defence they all commenced, chattering at once with the greatest volubility, expatiating upon their respective merits- better servants never lived- they were quite the thing – always did as or-dered – couldn’t think how it occurred. This harangue was cut short by each,of them being sent lo the Factory for a month. They left the Court jabbering like so many talkative magpies.

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1836, November 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), p. 3. Retrieved May 23, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2207626

 

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HOWELL, John

Sent to trip-it on the light fantastic toe, 1832 Sydney

MONDAY.-John Howell was pulled up to the bar on a charge of being a bolter from Argyleshire, and drunk the previous evening, at which time he was attempting to delude a lady of the Pavé, with “Will you come to the bower that I’ve shaded for you – when a-Charley politely intimated that his company was required at the watch-house, ” don’t you wish you may get it,” said John, offering to show fight ; come, come, said Charley, follow me, and John did follow, thinking it would be better for him; John was sent to trip-it on the light fantastic toe for seven days

* Lady of the Pavé = lady of the street

POLICE INCIDENTS. (1832, March 19). The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842), p. 4. Retrieved January 2, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654083

 
 

HUNT, Sarah

A motley crowd at fancy ball 1839 Sydney

FANCY BALLS.-Mrs Sarah Hunt appeared on Friday last, to answer the information of the Chief Constable for selling one gill of rum, without being duly licensed, contrary to the Act &c., on the third day of January instant, to which she pleaded not guilty. It appeared that on the morning of the day named.in the information, -between the-very seasonable hour of three and four o’clock. Constable’ Brooks went disguised as a- gentleman, with frock coat and .corresponding costume, to a loft-in the rear of a house at-the corner of – and Elizabeth-streets, where there was a fancy ball held, not for the purpose of mingling with the motley crowd (who were tripping it on the” light fantastic toe”) at the said ball up tile ladder, but to regale himself and a brother of the staff with a ball below, and where the worth) Mrs Hunt was dispensing bacchanalian favors in the shape of pot of ” heavy wet,” and half pints of lighter cordials to the mirthful revellers with untiring zeal-and smiling complacency. ” A gill of rum, if you please ma’am ?” – Oh certainly, Sir, but ” no tick;” you understand me?” Oh! certainly, ma’am.” Tile money was paid, the liquor swallowed. and the law broken. Mrs Hunt flatly contradicted .the statement of the constable in every particular, and protested they had most shamefully foresworn themselves but unhappily, this excellent matron produced no evidence to shake their testimony. Sentenced to pay a fine of £30, one half to the informer, and the other to be appropriated as the law directs, with 40s. costs; and-in default of payment within seven days, to be imprisoned for the period two calendar months.

Police News. (1839, January 21). The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 – 1841), p. 2 (MORNING). Retrieved January 2, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32162623

People loved fancy dress balls – they were the height of fashion in England, Europe, America, and colonial Australia.  A ticket to a masquerade ball in Bayswater, London (1820) © The Trustees of the British Museum

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